Carl Meredith Buchanan
(1930 - 2009)

Profile:
Carl Meredith Buchanan

Birth:
Washington, United States of America
July 18, 1930

Passing:
Colorado, United States of America
June 7, 2009

Interests:
Gardening, Reading, Classic cars, Broadway musicals, Camping, U.S. History
Guest Book
Looking through the photos again and just keeps bringing back great memories of all the family. Miss you Uncle Carl.
Douglas Buchanan (Nephew)
October 28th, 2010
This is harder than I thought it would be...just wanted to check in and leave a note. I guess I'm moving on the best I can, but it's still hard. I miss you Pop!
Steve Buchanan (Son)
June 7th, 2010
Some of my best memories of Dad are the great christmas's he gave us when we were little. He always made them so much fun, and we were spoiled just a little too much. And he loved decorating the house and listening to christmas music. I'm sure thats the reason why I love it so much too.
loree droullard (daughter)
January 20th, 2010
I've been thinking about you a lot this week, Dad. I miss you...
Amy Buchanan (Daughter)
December 2nd, 2009
We were so sorry to hear about Carl's passing but wanted you to know that we have thought about you, Bev, & kids so often & know you are missing Carl every day. He was such a great guy & very generous as well. We remember visiting Denver & on short notice calling you & your door was always open. We remember his perfection whenever he did anything because he wanted his project to look perfect & believe it did! We did not know him in his late years but remember his sense of humor & appreciated it. Again Bev & family, we are so sorry in your loss & sorry this is coming to you late as well. Warmly, Penny & Al Davis
Penny/Al Davis (friends( once neighbors))
September 7th, 2009
Uncle Carl seemed to have less interest in long distance relationships than most people and that may have disapointed some but he welcomed anyone near him into his presence.
"Sadly, No longer little Carl"
Carl Allen Buchanan (Nephew)
August 23rd, 2009
I'll be thinking of you today Dad on your birthday. I think about you often and dream about you just as much. Good dreams where we are doing things we liked to do together. I miss you and love you.
Steve Buchanan (Son)
July 18th, 2009
Comments from the memorial website set-up through the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner follwing the printing of Dad's obituary...

June 18, 2009
Bev, I too was shocked to hear of Carl's passing. He was always one of my favorites during my years at BLM. Not only a good co-worker, but a very nice guy to be around--always cheery and upbeat. We had fun sharing SE Alaska stories.
Carl Jeglum, Fairbanks, Alaska


June 17, 2009
Thinking of You.

Our condolences for the
loss of your loved one.

We wish you peace and acceptance
during this difficult time.

Joe Hayes ’97
UAF Alumni Association
Executive Director
Joe Hayes, Fairbanks, Alaska,


June 16, 2009

carl was a good person. i haven't seen him in quite a while and send my condolences to his family. i haven't seen him since his BLM days and was shocked to hear about his passing. rest in peace, carl.
bill earnest, Fairbanks, Alaska
Amy Buchanan (Daughter)
June 26th, 2009
I know he had a bunch more of these silly little sayings. I can't think of them all right now.

"If I'm the kid, you're the goat and all the slop goes down your throat." I guess Dad thought these words soothed our fragile childhood egos??

"A man got hit with a bag of sh*t for telling dirty lies." His way of saying, "Don't lie!" Beware those circumstances...ewww!
Amy Buchanan (Daughter)
June 26th, 2009
What an exhausting couple of weeks...

I am so thankful for all the kind words spoken and sent across the miles to our family. I can't imagine going through this without such a great group of brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and of course, my mom.

Thanks also for everyone's help with Dad's service. Gut-wrenching but perfect is how I'd describe it to friends and family unable to make the voyage to Ferndale, WA.

It was great to re-connect and even meet so many more of you from Dad's very large family. Let's do it again and soon...and under happier circumstances.

** If you are visiting this memorial site, please leave a comment, a story, even your name.
Amy Buchanan (Daughter)
June 26th, 2009
I remember Carl very fondly, alway smiling, always joking. He could lighten the mood in any room with his "Carl-ness". I will always remember him fondly and he will always hold a special place in my heart. Much love to all his family who are coping with his loss.
Bethany Buchanan
June 22nd, 2009
I'm posting some links here of more pictures and movies.

This is a Tribute movie/slideshow for Dad. This version does not have "Danny Boy".
http://gallery.me.com/awakelate/100033
Photos only:
http://gallery.me.com/awakelate/100041
Steve Buchanan (Son)
June 19th, 2009
When I was a boy, I would wonder what I would leave behind when I died. How would I be remembered? Now I wonder, what is Dad's legacy? What did he teach us and what lessons has he left with us?

It is hard to know someone outside of the context of your personal relationship with them. I knew and loved Carl Buchanan as a son. He was a father to 4 sons; Mike, Bruce, Jared, and myself and 3 daughters; Kathy, Loree, and Amy. In some ways he was a "father" to many others whose lives he touched. He was a friend, confidant, advisor, and mentor to a long list of people that he met and worked with.

He was married twice, and for the last 41 years as husband to my mother, Beverly Buchanan. During their time together my father was ever present to support my mother through her many difficult and life threatening illnesses. His loyalty was constant and loving.

When I think of words to describe Dad I come up with mischievous, relaxed, devoted, loving, handsome, handy, and dreamer. I'm sure you can all think of many more. My sister Amy simply calls Dad's personality his "Carl-ness". We could all use a little Carl-ness.

Now that it is too late, I find myself wishing I knew more about the man and his life. I know only about half of the story and that half is colored by my own relationship as his son. I wish I could see him through others’ eyes to get a more complete picture. I've spent many hours over the past several days thinking about his life as I pour over old photos and documents, reliving memories and looking for clues.

We all know and remember Dad's particular sense of humor. He was clever and gifted when it came to using humor to lighten the mood or diffuse a situation. I see this sense of humor in his children, especially in Bruce, Jared, Amy, and myself to a lesser extent. Some people know that Dad was a stutterer and as such sometimes he had difficulty getting his words out. I don't know for sure, but I think he developed this sense of humor in part as a defensive mechanism when he was young because of his stuttering. That and I'm sure he realized early on that a handsome young man that makes people around him laugh can get away with almost anything. So much of my own mannerisms and humor come directly from Dad. How many times did he say he was going to put the kiebash on one of us? I always figured that kiebash was a word that Dad made up. I looked it up and the origins of the word are unknown. So, for the record, that's a Dad word.

Dad's sense of humor opened doors for him. To overcome his speech problem, he talked to people. In a casual way, I think he worked at it, but truly it came naturally to him. Dad was a social person, but only in person. He didn't care much to talk on the telephone and wasn't interested in joining the Internet revolution. By then he was retired and done with computers. Everywhere Dad went, from his work, to school, or to the corner grocery, he made friends. He could break the ice with anyone and because of that was able to cross over to many social groups and was liked by each of them.

When Dad went back to school at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, not surprisingly, he studied Sociology. This is the study of society, human social interaction, and the rules and processes that bind and separate individuals and groups. Even as an older, adult student Dad was very popular with his classmates. We call this his hippy phase. What I learned from Dad at this time was a love of books and especially literature. He would study for hours with his books spread out on the bed, and I would quietly sit there and look through the books. After studying, sometimes we would go for walks in the woods around the student housing. He taught me about the trees and other vegetation, how to build shelters, and many other things but mostly an appreciation for the outdoors. The learning continued on many camping trips with siblings and friends.

I mentioned the different groups that Dad could effortlessly navigate between. Let me give you some examples.
My brother Bruce worked on the North Slope of Alaska during the pipeline days and knew a guy that to my young eyes was a rough-around-the-edges biker type. Once or twice he went camping with us and we stood around the campfire and joked and told stories for hours. Later in the week though, you would find Dad in a suit and tie back at work, or maybe traveling out of town for a conference.

And as an older student at UAF Dad also became good friends with one of his professors, an eccentric man with a passion for big game hunting.

During the summers, Dad worked with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) during fire season, and introduced us to a whole new group of friends. Dad still has good friends from his days as an Alaska Fish & Game officer in Southeast, and others from his Sitka days.

Dad worked until his retirement for the BLM in various positions, but mostly as a safety and training officer. In addition to his regular duties, Dad became the unofficial BLM social worker wherever he was stationed. During this time period I really saw something special in Dad in the way that he accepted people, worked with them, and helped them better their lives. Sometimes people just want a caring person to listen to them or a shoulder to cry on. Above all, we all want to be treated with respect and Dad knew how to do that. Dad taught me the true meaning of charity. He was a "giver" as they say, not in terms of money necessarily, but in benevolent goodwill and lenient judgment of others.

The lessons we can keep with us and pass on to others are these:
-Be loyal and supportive of family
-Don't take life too seriously
-Be aware of and enjoy each moment of this wonderful life
-Don't be afraid to make new friends, even if they are different
-Give freely of yourself and your time

Dad was not a wealthy man in the ways commonly used to count and categorize. Through the years, we typically had enough to get by, but no more. But Dad was always generous and shared what he had. Looking back now, it is obvious where his wealth lay. In family. He steadily invested in all of us. Look around at all of us here today. We are his legacy and there is nothing he was prouder of in this world.

In the end, all of his children found their way back to Dad one last time. I saw him near the end and now I see him all around me. I see him in all of us. His life's work and influence will carry on.

I would like to thank you all, family and friends, for coming together and working together to honor and remember Carl Meredith Buchanan.

Steven Buchanan (Son)
June 19th, 2009
This is the memorial I set up for Carl Buchanan. To add your own comment, click on the "Add Comment" button below.
Steven Buchanan
June 15th, 2009
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"Was so very sorry to hear of Carl's passing. He was such a wonderful person. He was very proud of his family and shone with love for you all. He had so much compassion for everyone. All of us who worked for him at BLM thought the world of him. "
Sunny Johnson
December 15th, 2009
"I am so sorry of hear of Carl's passing. I thought the world of Carl. He was a wonderful man and friend and will be missed by all who knew him. My thoughts and prayers are with Beverly, Steven, Amy and Jared."
Gaye Paquet
June 19th, 2009

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